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Embracing the “terrible” twos

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Anyone interested in so-called positive parenting or gentle parenting is probably familiar with Dr. Laura Markham and her Aha! Parenting website. I find myself reading and re-reading many of her posts and tonight I came across this fantastic list of reminders for parents who, like me, are starting to see the first glimpses of those dreaded “terrible” twos in their until-now saintly toddler.

I won’t tell you more about it because the list is perfect and clear as it is. All I will say is: please, if you have a toddler, read this. Think about what it says, apply as much as you can, print it out and keep it close for when times get a little difficult, and go ahead and embrace that beautiful toddler of yours.

Happy read!

(Original post from Aha! Parenting can be found here).

Toddlers: Your Game Plan for the Terrific Twos

How to manage your toddler and stay a positive parent?

Most children become harder to manage at around fourteen months. That’s because they make a huge developmental leap at this point. They’re not so easily distracted. They realize that you’re a separate person, who can sometimes–but not nearly often enough–be influenced to do things their way. They realize they have some influence in the world, but not a lot of power, and they start experimenting to see how they can get their needs met and their desires fulfilled.

This can be a maddening time for parents, or it can be a Photo: Angela Sevinwonderful time, watching your child blossom into a person in her own right.  How difficult the phase from 15 to 36 months is depends mostly on the parent’s attitude. Your child’s rebellion will be inversely proportional to the freedom she’s given to do her developmental work.

How much is he allowed to explore? To set his own pace?  To feel in control of his world?  To discover that he is a competent person?

Much of this depends on the parent.  Are you sensitive to your child’s readiness for independence, supporting but not pushing? Can you appreciate your child’s bids for independence without taking them as personal insults?  Can you give up some control so your child can develop some sense of mastery over her world? Can you set whatever limits are necessary for her safety and your sanity, while empathizing with her disappointment when she doesn’t get what she wants?

Your Toddler’s Developmental Tasks:

Rapid physical and brain development.
Rapid acquisition of vocabulary and verbal rules.
Learning how to stay connected to you while he asserts his own needs and wants.
Development of Agency (sense of oneself as a powerful, competent person able to act upon the world).
Learning that other children are people too, and that he relate to them safely, so he doesn’t have to be aggressive with them.

Your Parenting Challenge:

Keeping your sanity while your baby increasingly expresses herself and engages with the world.

Your Parenting Priorities:

1. Keeping your child safe as she explores.
2. Giving up some control so he can develop some mastery over his world.
3. Enjoying her emerging independence and curiosity.
4. Staying positive!

“The first three years of life establishes the blueprints for all of our future relationships.” — John Bowlby

What toddlers need from their parents:

1. The validation of her own agency.  She needs to learn that there are things she is in charge of, such as her own body, and she needs to experience herself as competent and powerful.

2. Structure, Limits, Routines and Security:  Toddlers are beginning to grasp that it’s a big world out there.  Even their own  feelings seem overwhelming to them at times.  They need the reassurance that the parent is in charge and can keep them safe  — from the world, and from their own big feelings and lack of self control.

3. Help understanding and structuring time so he feels less out of control and pummeled by circumstance (“After lunch it’s nap time, and then we’ll drive to Grandma’s.”)  Toddlers need to know what to expect and do better with a definite routine.

4. Your empathy: Look at it from his point of view, and you’ll see it makes sense.  Even if you can’t do what he wants, it will help him to cooperate if you can understand and sympathize with his unhappiness.

Gameplan for a Fun Toddlerhood:

Photo: Crushed Red Pepper

1. Let your child be in charge of potty training.  They all get out of diapers sooner or later. Fights with your child about his or her body are fights you will never win.  Toilet training can actually be empowering for your child, an important step in independence, but it depends how you handle it.  If your child shows zero interest in toilet training, find opportunities for him to be around other kids who are using the toilet, and he’ll quickly want to emulate them. For more on easy potty learning, click here.

2. Sidestep power struggles.  You don’t have to prove you’re right. Your child is trying to assert that he is a real person, with some real power in the world.  That’s totally appropriate.  Let him say no whenever you can do so without compromise to safety, health, or other peoples’ rights.  You’ll be glad to know that since tantrums are an expression of powerlessness, toddlers who feel some control over their lives have many fewer tantrums.

3. Pre-empt tantrums.  First, know that tantrums are normal for kids this age.  Second, since most tantrums happen when kids are hungry or tired, think ahead.  Preemptive feeding and napping, firm bedtimes, re-connection with you,  cozy times, peaceful quiet time without media stimulation —  whatever  it takes to calm down and rest —  prevent most tantrums, and reground kids who are getting whiny. Learn to just say no  — to yourself!  Don’t squeeze in that last errand.  Don’t drag a hungry or tired kid to the store. Make do and do it tomorrow.  For more on taming toddler tantrums, click here.

4. Use play to “manage” your toddler.  Toddlers don’t like to be ordered around any more than you do.  What they do love is to play.  Want cooperation? Fly your toddler up to her bath.  Get him to finish his milk by pretending to be a puppy who loves milk.  Get her into her carseat by pretending to be the flight attendant preparing for takeoff.  Race him to the car.

5. Don’t take it personally.  Your toddler will at times reject you or be hurtful in some way.  Don’t take it personally.  She’s learning from you how to modulate her anger.  This is your opportunity to grow, and teach her at the same time.

6. Allow time in your schedule for your toddler’s need to explore the world.  That’s his job, after all — exploring, experimenting, learning.  That’s how his brain develops.  Rushing toddlers is one of the common triggers of avoidable tantrums.

7. Cultivate empathy for your child.  Social skills start with your empathy.  Kids begin to develop empathy for others (and therefore, the ability to share, not hit, etc.) as they themselves feel understood. Click here for more on what empathy is and how to use it to raise great kids.

8. Don’t force her to share.  That actually delays the development of sharing skills!  Kids need to feel secure in their ownership before they can share. Instead, introduce the concept of taking turns. (“It’s Crystal’s turn to use the bucket.  Then it will be your turn.”)  Help him wait for his turn with empathy. Help him put his favorite toys away before another child visits.  When he does share, out of the goodness of his own heart, empower him to make that choice again by observing, aloud, the effect of his choice: “Look how happy Michael is that he gets a turn with your truck.”

9. Use age-appropriate “discipline.”  For toddlers, that means empathic limits, information, redirection, and help with emotions.  Researchers compared two groups of toddlers who were rated as behaving about the same. They watched what happened when parents spanked them.  The children who were spanked behaved worse a year later than the kids who weren’t.  Even yelling at toddlers has a negative effect, causing them to harden their hearts to you and become defiant.  Toddlerhood is where violence starts: Are you unwittingly teaching your kids that might makes right? (See Positive Discipline, for help in managing your toddler.)

10. Be the person you want your child to be. Children learn to interact with others by experiencing relationships, and then they recreate them.  Remember that your toddler is learning both sides of any relationship she’s in.  If you don’t want her to tantrum, don’t lose your temper at her. If you yell at her, you’re teaching her by example that tantrums are ok.

11. Eliminate visual electronic media.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children under the age of two not watch TV or videos at all because they have other important developmental work to do and because it impacts brain development.  The AAP recommends that older children watch AT MOST an hour or two per day of nonviolent, educational TV.  I recommend TV and movies only for special occasions. I know we’re told that Sesame Street is good for our children, but research shows that it influences brain development and shortens the attention span. It starts an addiction in kids who are prone to it. When they’re a little older, they’ll want to watch other TV. And before they’re much older, you’ll wonder why they flip on the TV instead of reading a book. Not to mention that you will have stopped being able to monitor what they watch by the time they’re eight.  For more on TV, see Why Your Toddler Shouldn’t Watch TV — and What to Do Instead.

12.  Feeding is the toddler’s job.  You provide the healthy food.  She feeds it to herself.  Put a mat under the high chair.   Don’t obsess about how much she eats. Kids don’t starve themselves. Many toddlers are too busy during the day to eat enough and ask for food at bedtime.  This can drive a parent around the bend, unless you build a bedtime snack into the schedule – which also often helps kids settle down and sleep better.  If you make sure the snack is healthy, you take the pressure off dinner so you can enjoy your child more at dinner without prodding them to eat. You can combine it with the bedtime story if you’re short on time.  Click here for more on feeding your toddler.

13. Forget about stimulating your child’s brain by teaching her the alphabet.  The intellectual work of toddlers is about exploring, observing the world, talking and being listened to, being accepted, validated and acknowledged. Emotional self-management lays the foundation for intellectual development. It’s never too early to develop a love of books, but that doesn’t happen by learning the alphabet.  If you want your child to love reading, then read to her and tell her stories.

14. Pre-empt whining.  Whining is an expression of the child’s feeling of powerlessness.  It can become a habit.  To nip whining in the bud, avoid letting your child have opportunities to learn that whining gets her what she wants.  In other words, try to avoid making whining necessary, and if it does happen, try to avoid rewarding it. Instead, help your child with those helpless feelings.  Click here for more on how to stop your toddler’s whining.

15. Use routines.  Kids develop self discipline partly by living in a safe, predictable structured routine where they know what to expect.  When you disrupt routines with travel,  Grandma’s visit, or simply exceptions for your own convenience, you can expect tantrums, difficulty falling asleep, and other challenges. Grandma, of course, is worth it, but choosing disruptions wisely is part of protective parenting. Click here for more on schedules and routines that toddlers can understand.

16.  Give her the opportunity to experience competence. Toddlers tantrum less and cooperate more when they feel more powerful.  How can you help your toddler feel more powerful?  Three key ways: Listen to her, Let her make decisions whenever possible, and give her the opportunity to experience competence.

Toddlers need daily experience with work to gain confidence in their own capabilities and begin to think of themselves as competent people.  I don’t mean burdensome work, I mean work in the spirit of Maria Montessori, and Tom Sawyer making the other kids think that white-washing the fence was the world’s best game.   In other words, toddlers LOVE to understand how the household functions, and to participate.  They LOVE to contribute.  They LOVE to learn.

Invite your toddler to be involved with whatever you’re doing.  Ok, so the help will make your job harder, but he’s learning and gaining skills for the future, and you’re bonding.

What kinds of household tasks?   They can stand on a stool or bench in the kitchen to help.  They can help you as you run errands.  They can help in the yard.  Specifically,

Make themselves a snack, such as peeling fruit or an egg, or slicing soft cheese and making sandwiches with crackers.
Help wash pots and pans or other unbreakable dishes.
Wash vegetables in the sink
Wipe the counter off
Help you clean the refrigerator
Help set the table
Help clear the table
Help you by turning lights on and off.
Dust
Scrub the tub (from inside, barefoot!)
Pair the socks as you fold clothes.
Sort clothes (which clean clothes belong to which family member?)
Help you transfer clothes from the washer to the dryer, pull clothes out of the dryer, or hang them on a line.
Pick out fruit at the grocery store.
Wash the table or floor.

These activities are ultimately more educational and satisfying than TV, and most young children love them.  After completing such a task, the toddler says “I did it!”  and feels like a more capable, powerful person. (Compare that to how they feel after they watch a TV show.)  Sure, it’s more work for the parent than just doing it yourself.  That’s not the point.  Toddlers and preschoolers who feel competent and powerful don’t need to assert their power by being contrary.  They’re more confident.  And they’re more helpful! That’s what I call win-win.

Click here for more on helping your child develop Competence.

 

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On taking a pause, and being honest with ourselves

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I have a huge amount of respect for people who know their limits. For those who recognize that sometimes taking a break is the most sensible way to go, no matter how much responsibility they feel towards their family, work, or friends. We all carry heavy loads at times, and I honestly believe that the world would be a better place if everyone felt that they have a right to say stop, please stop for a second.

This is, of course, a luxury. Not everyone has the support network or simply the choice to take a break when they need it (big or small). Frankly, there is little or no room in our society for stopping when we need to catch a breath. This is especially true at the workplace, where any sign of fatigue is simply interpreted as weakness.

And this is why I’d love to bring to your attention a blog post written by Dreena Burton, vegan cook author and super mama to three girls.

In “Pressing Pause,” Dreena says that she needs to slow down because she feels overwhelmed by her career and her motherlode. As has always been the case with her, her words were so candid and genuine that I really sympathized with her. Her call for a break seems very brave to me, and I think she’s teaching her children an invaluable lesson in self-respect. So, here’s to Dreena, for teaching us a little more than just cooking amazing food.

If you’d like to learn more about Dreena Burton, check out to her website, Plant-Powered Kitchen. And please get one of her cookbooks if you don’t have them yet. I own all of them! (The photo above is my variation on Dreena’s Super-charge-me cookies from her book Eat, Drink and be Vegan).

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Screen addiction: time to take things seriously

First: I’m so sorry for the long absence. My digital break for the holidays was definitely longer than advertised, and no one missed My Little, Green Family more than I did!

It’s been a very intense time for me, trying to juggle freelance work, looking-for-fulltime-work work, and finding a place to live and getting organized for our big move to Toronto. (We’re finally moving to Toronto in May, which is where I have always wanted to live. I’m super excited and yet sad because I will miss my Ottawa friends so much. But more on that later…).

Thank you to all of you who asked about the blog, wondering when it would be back. It’s back now! And hopefully I’ll manage to keep it going on a regular basis again.

Now, to today’s discussion: It’s time to take warnings about screen time seriously.

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I came across two compelling articles this week that I would like to share with you. The first is a blog post by Cris Rowan, a pediatric occupational therapist, who is calling for an all-out ban of handheld devices for children under the age of 12. Rowan cites mounds of research to support her campaign, some of which I find a bit of a stretch (like her use of the term “digital dementia”). Though I wouldn’t necessarily support her call for a ban of handheld devices, Rowan’s summary of reasons to limit screen time for babies and children is a very useful one if you have slipped into complacency and need a reminder to scale back on screen time for your little ones.

You can read the whole thing here:

10 Reasons Why Handheld Devices Should Be Banned for Children Under the Age of 12

The second article I read was published by Time magazine. It cites a study by the Boston Medical Centre which revealed that parents’ use of screen time affected their behaviour towards their children. What called my attention is that the study focused on the parents’ use of technology instead of the children’s, which is an obvious yet sometimes overlooked part of the equation when talking about screen time for children.

The Time article mentions modelling behaviour, which is, if you recall, one of the most important aspects of positive parenting: show your children how to behave by behaving the way you want them to. The piece is, is one word, sad. It shows that distracted parents who were entranced by their screens while having a meal with their kids responded curtly or rudely when the children tried to call their attention away from the devices. I know I’ve been there. I know you’ve been there. And I know it’s totally normal and I don’t want to be a complete freak about being a perfect parent, but reading this did make me want to pay much closer attention to my screen habits.

You can read the Time article here:

Don’t Text While Parenting — It Will Make You Cranky

My sister and her family came to visit us for a couple of days last week. One afternoon, I was surprised to find my 5-year-old nephew reading a book, quiet and focused for almost one hour. My brother-in-law said his son —a very active 5-year-old— has taken up the habit of reading in the afternoons. He credits his son’t nice reading habit to the fact that both him and my sister tend to do just that when they have some down time: grab a magazine or a book and read on the couch for a while.

Like us, my sister and her family don’t have cable and only watch TV on the computer screen occasionally, for short periods of time. Not having a TV means that it is not the default activity for when you’re bored. In their case, reading is their default activity. And that has evidently impacted their son’s habits. On the other hand, my nephew does love the grab his parents’ smartphones and they struggle to keep him away from the phones. And how can you insist that your children don’t play with your phone when that’s what they see you doing all the time?

It’s really up to us to regulate our own behaviour, and take the limiting of screen time more seriously.

What do you think? As always, I’d love to hear from you!

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Thank you and Merry Christmas!

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I’m taking a digital break for the holidays, which I plan to spend sliding with S and D (I am loving winter this year!), eating cookies, and drinking wine with our friends and family. So this short post is just to say thank you, wish you well, and keep you hooked for the new year.

Writing this blog has been lots of fun so far, and I look forward to many more conversations with all of you in the new year. Thank you for reading, and thank you for your comments and insights. I love having you as my readers. I will be back in January with some more info, rants, and possibly confessions.

I wish all of you a warm, love-filled holiday season, and a 2014 with plenty of surprises and fun for you and your lil’ family.

With love,

G.

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Here is what NOT to get your kids for Christmas: infant seat with iPad

IMG_1336 Her seat didn’t need an iPad

I’m not just about to lecture you on how you should approach screen time for infants and toddlers. In our home, we are pretty selective about our TV watching (we have a screen that we use occasionally and don’t subscribe to cable). Our daughter is under a “screen ban” for the first two years of her life. This includes smartphone screens and any other screens. I know, and I understand, that many parents use a screen occasionally to soothe or distract their children for a few minutes. How you handle screen time is your decision (hopefully an informed one).

But what I will do is tell you what not to buy —please, pretty please— for your kids or any of your friends’ or relatives’ kids for Christmas: this infant seat with an iPad stand. Why do I feel so strongly about this? There are several reasons:

  • Research has shown that exposure to screens can develop attention disorders later, affecting children’s behaviour and learning abilities in school. In this article in Additude, a magazine dedicated to Attention Deficit Disorder, the author says: “According to Dr. [Dimitri] Christakis [who researches this subject], the rapidly moving images on TV and in video games may rewire the brains of very young children, making it difficult for them to focus on slower tasks that require more thought.”
  • The American Association of Pediatrics recommends the following: “Television and other entertainment media should be avoided for infants and children under age 2. A child’s brain develops rapidly during these first years, and young children learn best by interacting with people, not screens.”
  • John Medina, author of Brain Rules for Baby (a highly recommended read for anyone with kids ages zero to five), has a similar approach to screens for infants: “Babies need face time. (…) Babies love to gaze at human faces. Mom’s is best of all. (…) What are they looking for in your face? Emotional information. Are you happy, sad, threatened? (…) The only way to improve this accuracy [in interpreting human emotions by looking at faces] is by interacting with other people. That’s why babies need human time in the earliest years. Not computer time. Not television time. Your baby’s brain needs interaction with you, in person, on a consistent basis.”

These two reasons —the potential to develop attention deficit disorders and the harm done to infants by replacing crucial face time with screen time— are often cited as the best reasons to shield children from screens as much as possible, and I agree wholeheartedly with them. But my beef with the iPad infant seat goes even beyond that.

The Fisher Price “Apptivity Seat” suggests that watching a screen is an activity, which is, of course, not. The deceitful marketing is made worse by Fisher Price’s suggestion that babies can benefit from “early learning” apps, which is, of course, a lie: there is absolutely no evidence that infants can learn anything glowing on a screen. I wish I could remember its name, but I once watched a documentary that explained that babies cannot learn any words or facial expressions from screens. Even when watching their mothers on a screen, babies simply were oblivious to cues and words uttered by them. In contrast, the same interactions, when done face to face, resulted in the babies responding to and learning words and facial expressions.

Aside from all the brain science behind it, there is also something I find inherently wrong with pushing a product onto our babies. The shameless marketing of Apple products, which hope to colonize every classroom in the world with dubious claims of educational benefits, has reached a new low with wanting to hook up infants into their screens. We really need to wonder, are we providing sound technology experiences to our children by inundating them with tablets and other screens, or are we merely training our children as future consumers?

The topic of children’s exposure to marketing and advertising is a whole other story, and one that I have been following for a few years. Check out this organization if you’re interested in learning more. They even have a petition to recall the monstrous Apptivity Seat: Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood.

As always, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks for reading my rant and have a great day!

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Positive parenting: self-regulation

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Hi and sorry for the long absence! I really have no excuse, other than I’ve just been busy with life in general. Never too busy to listen to the radio, though. (I’m an incurable CBC radio junky).

I went for a short drive on Sunday, and I ended up idling my car at a parking lot because this documentary was playing on CBC: How does your engine run? It was a fascinating piece about a pilot project in schools in Surrey, British Columbia, where teachers are training kids to self-regulate their behaviour.

The gist of the story is that these teachers are dealing with behaviour issues driven by stress in a very interesting way: by identifying what is stressing each kid and offering individual solutions for them. For instance, one girl is so hyper that when her behaviour is spiraling out of control, she goes for a run to calm down. It doesn’t matter if it’s in the middle of a class. Another kid just hates his chair and can’t focus, so he gets to seat on a special cushion. It has nothing to do with discipline —it’s all about observing and understanding each kid’s needs. And it’s all about each kid identifying their own tipping point at doing something about it.

But wait, isn’t this supposed to be a post about positive parenting? Yes! I found this story to be perfectly in tune with one of the principles of positive parenting that we’ve been talking about: treating children with respect. So many times, in so many instances, I feel that we look at our children from the top down, and we reach conclusions about their behaviour that in reality have nothing to do with what is going on in their minds and bodies.

I think respect means that, even from a very early age —from Day One, I’d say— we should try to listen to what our kids are trying to tell us, instead of projecting our ideas onto them. And we should really toss away that obsolete notion that kids behave badly just to make us feel bad. Treating our kids with respect means that we understand their behaviour is not about us, but rather about something they need and are trying to communicate to us.

It seems to me that respect is at the heart of this idea of teaching self-regulation to children, because it forces us to trust their ability to understand themselves; to trust that they can identify their own limits and deal with them, even from a very early age. Simply put, respecting our children empowers them.

So yes, I think positive parenting has a lot to do with teaching self-regulation. And I think I’m on the right track, because my friend E., from The Mindful Parent, also recommended the CBC doc to me🙂

I encourage you to check it out. Read the story and listen to the doc here.

As always, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Have a great week!

 

6

Honey, oh sugar, sugar: the green guide to sugar do’s and dont’s

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I picked up a copy of EcoParent today and found the most practical guide to sugar-eating there is. So, as we dive into the cookie-ladden holidays, I want to share some bits of it with you.

(Full disclosure: I contribute to EcoParent. But, rest assured, I would have endorsed this information regardless of my relationship with the magazine.)

 

Dr. Heidi Lescanec, the Naturopathic Doctor who writes the article, explains the difference between processed sugar and naturally occurring sugar, like the one found in fruit, this way:

  • In nature, sugars and carbohydrates (our energy sources) come with vitamins, minerals, enzymes, proteins, fat and fiber. (…) In their whole form, sugar fuels our body function, while refined sugars, on the other hand, are devoid of nutrients.

That’s the Doctor’s first warning. And then she goes on to say why consumption of refined sugars has been linked to diabetes, Alzheimer’s and cancer:

  • Regular high consumption of refined sugars actually depletes the body’s essential reserves of what it needs to function. In addition, when we consume refined sugars alone without proteins, good fats, or fiber, they enter the bloodstream in a rush.

Dr. Lescanec offers a general recommendation:

  • Choose more wholesome sweeteners, eat them in moderation, and make sure to include protein, fiber or healthy fat in your meals or snacks so that the entry of glucose into the bloodstream is slower.

Now, this is the practical knowledge you need before making that first batch of gingerbread cookies. (This is a summary. Do pick up a copy of EcoParent to read the whole thing. It’s truly enlightening —plus, the rest of the magazine is a great read!).

Refined, commercial sweeteners that you should avoid:

Agave: Sold as a health food, agave is now in the hall of shame of sugar. It is marketed as having a low glycemic index, usually a good thing, but the only reason for that is that agave is high in fructose. In short, this means that your body doesn’t metabolize it well at all. I used agave quite a bit in the past but it has no place in my pantry anymore.

White granulated sugar: You probably know this already, but white sugar is highly refined, has no nutrients, and is simply terrible for your health. If you’ve substituted white sugar for brown sugar, see the next entry.

Brown sugar: It might look more artisanal, but the knowledgeable Doctor Lescanec reminds us that brown sugar is pretty much exactly the same as white sugar, only that it has kept some of its molasses. Meaning: brown sugar is also terrible for your health.

Demerara, Turbinado, and Muscavado: I have fallen victim to their fancy names before. Have you? These three types of sugar are pretty much the same, with varying amounts of molasses. All of them are refined sugars with 99% sucrose —same as white and brown sugar. Their appeal is that they are less processed sugars, if only slightly.

High Fructose corn syrup: This is the real bad guy on the list. Known as glucose-fructose in Canada, HFCS is pretty much on every processed food there is, savoury or sweet. It’s the main ingredient in pop. You should avoid this like the plague. Your body simply doesn’t digest this type of sugar, so it goes directly into your bloodstream. HFCS has been directly linked to the obesity epidemic in North America. (A huge bonus of avoiding HFCS is that you will inevitably stop buying processed foods for the most part, if not altogether. Try it as an experiment. You’ll never look back and your future self will thank you.)

This list doesn’t include artificial sweeteners, so here’s my own advice: That stuff is crap. Research has shown that it will hurt your brain cells. Don’t have it.

 

Now, for the good news: sugars you can have!

Unrefined natural sugars that are better options:

Honey: Honey contains vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, amino acids and good bacteria. You should, however, look for raw, pure honey, since the processed kind generally lacks all this good stuff. Plus, it tastes so much better.

Stevia: This is extracted from a natural herb and it’s a lot sweeter than regular sugar. The down side is that it’s not easy to cook or bake with. It’s mostly used for hot beverages.

Maple syrup: This one is my absolute favourite. I buy the 1L jugs at Costco whenever I can and use it for almost all my baking. Maple Syrup has tonnes of anti-oxidants and more vitamins and minerals that any other type of sugar. We’re so lucky that we can get the good stuff here in Canada.❤

Sucanat and Rapadura: These two are pretty much the same, except for the size of their granules. They’re made of dehydrated sugar cane juice. They preserve the good vitamins and minerals of sugar cane, which means that this helps you digest it.

Coconut sugar: I was pleased to find this one on the list because I felt adventurous at Bulk Barn the other day and bought a bunch of it. It’s delicious and perfect for baking. It’s not very nutrient rich, but has a very low glycemic index.

Molasses: We’re vegetarian, as you may have noticed, so we need to keep an eye for our iron levels. I buy the blackstrap molasses kind, which is very high in iron (and many other nutrients), and use it to cook beans in it. For regular molasses, which is high in iron, zinc, copper and chromium, look for unsulphured molasses (it’s safer because it has no sulphites. These are bad for you, and especially bad for kids.)

 

I really hope this list helps you navigate the supermarket isles better. I’m definitely going to keep it handy in the future. Again, I highly recommend that you pick up the magazine and read the whole article. There’s a lot more useful information, plus a couple of recipes, in it.

Lastly, if you’re still curious about the topic of sugar, the CBC’s Fifth Estate recently aired a pretty good, short documentary about sugar. It’s not the most in-depth investigation but it definitely has useful information, like how to visualize your sugar intake in a whole week —totally scary. You can watch the documentary here.

As always, let me know your thoughts! Have a great week and happy good-sugar baking : )